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ISBN: 978-0578113005
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The Land of My Father’s Birth: Memoir of the Liberian Civil War

by: Nvasekie Konneh
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The Liberian civil war affected all Liberians, one way or the other. As a result, all Liberians have some stories of personal experiences of the war that lasted for 14 years. The war caused internal and external dislocation of thousands of people and so many lost loved ones, relatives, and friends. Every Liberian has stories to tell about how they got caught up behind warring faction lines or made it as refugees in other countries. There has not been enough books published telling stories of these experiences. Unlike Sierra Leone, Sudan, or Ivory Coast where books with stories of former child soldiers and survival of war have been published, not many personal stories in the form of memoir have been published by Liberians. Nvasekie Konneh’s memoir, “The Land of My Father’s Birth” will certainly set the pace to fill that void. This book the size of about 250 pages gives the panoramic views of the writer’s experiences of growing up in pre-war Liberia, highlighting his multicultural heritage of Mandingo and Mano ethnicities; fleeing from the war doomed Monrovia, seeking refuge in Abidjan, Ivory Coast where he met and befriended a feature first daughter of the country’s first military leader Robert Guei; cruising the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean or Persian Gulf in the bellies of US Navy war ships deployed in Europe and Middle East, highlighting port visits to such far away places as Jerusalem/Bethlehem in Israel/Palestine; Suez Canal, Egypt, Dubai, United Arab Emirate, Paris, France, as well as “Looking for Fatim Diop in Dakar,” Senegal. The book is a multicultural celebration of ethnic and religious diversity which will certainly generate lots of conversations with historical, socio-political, art and cultural dimensions in and out of Liberia. For those who have been following this prolific writer since the early 90s, he has diverse interests as a writer whose writings have been extensively published in newspapers, magazine, as well as countless websites

Meet the Author
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Nvasekie N. Konneh is a Liberian writer, poet, magazine publisher, community and cultural activist whose works have been widely published in newspapers and on websites in Liberia, US and Europe. Years before coming to the United States in 1995, Nvasekie Konneh’s commentaries and poems on politics, arts and culture appeared regularly in the Eye newspaper and the Monrovia Daily News, Inquirer and the New Democrat. While living in New York City, his articles appeared in the African Voices literary magazine as well as the City Sun and the Black Star News newspapers. In April 2002, he participated and won the First Place Award in the Liberian Civil War poetry competition held in Providence, Rhode Island under the sponsorship of the Liberian Community Association of Rhode Island. The winning poem in that competition was "Scene of Sorrow II". In 2003, the prolific Liberian writer and poet published his first book of poems, Going to War for America.

To the surprise of many who had admired his writings back in Liberia and who hoped he would continue to pursue literary career in the US, Nvasekie Konneh enlisted in the US Navy in August 1996. He served for nine unbroken years between 1996 and 2005. While serving in the US Navy, Nvasekie Konneh made two deployments on board the USS Detroit, a navy logistic ship based at the Navy Weapon Station, Earle, New Jersey. His last deployment was part of the Operation Desert Fox, an American-British military engagement against the regime of Saddam Hussein in December 1998 after his expulsion of the UN weapon inspectors. Nvasekie’s ship, USS Detroit was also part in the operation to liberate Kosovo. From September 2000 to September 2003, he took assignment in Philadelphia with the SALTS Team at the Naval Inventory Control Point (NAVICP). After his three-year shore duty, Nvasekie Konneh’s next assignment took him to the nuclear aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) or the "IKE" as the aircraft carrier is affectionately called. The IKE is home-ported in Norfolk, Virginia.

While serving on active duty in the U. S. Navy, Nvasekie Konneh did not burry his activist side. He was the founding chairman of the National Civil Right Movement (NCRM), a Philadelphia based Liberian pro-democracy and human rights organization. Through this organization, Nvasekie Konneh led more than 700 people in demonstration in Washington DC on September 16, 2002 at the Liberian Embassy, demanding the unconditional release of the then imprisoned Liberian journalist, Hassan Bility, and other illegally detained Liberians by the brutal regime of Charles Taylor. Few months later, he led another demonstration in Washington DC, this time at the U.S. Capitol against the continued illegal detention of Liberian human rights activist, Aloysius Toe and others.

The Land of My Father’s Birth is the latest book by Nvasekie Konneh. It was launched on February 23, 2013 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Since then he continues to have book signing events in various places in the US as well as in Liberia.

Books of Nvasekie Konneh
About This Book
Overview

The Liberian civil war affected all Liberians, one way or the other. As a result, all Liberians have some stories of personal experiences of the war that lasted for 14 years. The war caused internal and external dislocation of thousands of people and so many lost loved ones, relatives, and friends. Every Liberian has stories to tell about how they got caught up behind warring faction lines or made it as refugees in other countries. There has not been enough books published telling stories of these experiences. Unlike Sierra Leone, Sudan, or Ivory Coast where books with stories of former child soldiers and survival of war have been published, not many personal stories in the form of memoir have been published by Liberians. Nvasekie Konneh’s memoir, “The Land of My Father’s Birth” will certainly set the pace to fill that void. This book the size of about 250 pages gives the panoramic views of the writer’s experiences of growing up in pre-war Liberia, highlighting his multicultural heritage of Mandingo and Mano ethnicities; fleeing from the war doomed Monrovia, seeking refuge in Abidjan, Ivory Coast where he met and befriended a feature first daughter of the country’s first military leader Robert Guei; cruising the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean or Persian Gulf in the bellies of US Navy war ships deployed in Europe and Middle East, highlighting port visits to such far away places as Jerusalem/Bethlehem in Israel/Palestine; Suez Canal, Egypt, Dubai, United Arab Emirate, Paris, France, as well as “Looking for Fatim Diop in Dakar,” Senegal. The book is a multicultural celebration of ethnic and religious diversity which will certainly generate lots of conversations with historical, socio-political, art and cultural dimensions in and out of Liberia. For those who have been following this prolific writer since the early 90s, he has diverse interests as a writer whose writings have been extensively published in newspapers, magazine, as well as countless websites

Details

ISBN: 978-0578113005
Publisher: Royal House Communication Consortium Inc
Publish Date: 2013
Page Count: 258

  1. Lasana AB. Kanneh

    Rated 5 out of 5

    Excellent and very informative